OpGen > Company

Company

Multi-Drug Resistant Organism Focus

OpGen is focused on combating life-threatening, antibiotic-resistant infections using molecular diagnostics and bioinformatics technologies. Our CLIA-certified diagnostic laboratory helps hospital staff to diagnose, prevent, and manage acute infections. We have extensive experience in the fields of microbial genetics, molecular diagnostics, and bioinformatics, and have developed The Acuitas™ MDRO Gene Test that directly detects seven critical multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO) genes including those associated with Gram-negative carbapenem resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE). The test detects the genes directly from a single patient swab or clinical isolate and test results are provided to client hospitals within 24 hours of sample receipt. We also provide follow-on testing that combines organism ID, antibiotics susceptibility testing, and DNA sequence-based information when needed. Our Lighthouse™ MDRO Management System is a bioinformatics tool that combines test results and hospital data to provide clients with real-time detection, monitoring, and management capabilities for identifying and tracking dangerous MDROs in their institution and guiding antibiotic stewardship programs.

OpGen’s Whole Genome Mapping technology, provides innovative tools for microbial genomic sequence assembly and finishing, strain comparison and species characterization for customers focused on DNA sequencing, epidemiology, outbreak identification, microbial forensics, biodefense and pharmaceutical discovery.

Company Overview

Multi-Drug Resistant Organism

OpGen, Inc. is a privately held, microbial genetics analysis company headquartered in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The company was founded in January 2002 by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), with the objectives of developing and commercializing products and services based on the proprietary Whole Genome Mapping technology for the high-precision microbial analysis market. The technology continues to be used today for the automated assembly and analysis of genomes by the world’s most prestigious sequencing centers. Additional applications developed for Whole Genome Mapping include microbial strain typing and comparative genomics. In 2011, the company expanded applications offered to encompass the assembly of large genomes such as those of humans, plants and animals. In 2013, The OpGen Clinical Services Laboratory achieved CLIA-certification and began offering testing services to address hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). The Acuitas MDRO Gene Test, the first to test seven critical MDRO genes from one patient swab, was launched in early 2014.

The company’s corporate offices, commercial MapIt® laboratory, and CLIA-certified Clinical Services Laboratory are located in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

Our Journey Forward

We believe that no patient should suffer from a life-threatening, drug-resistant infection and we aim to transform infectious disease management through innovation in microbiology, molecular diagnostics, and information technologies. We invest to develop state-of-the-art tests with in-depth validation of clinical performance. Our centralized testing capabilities provide affordable, highly accurate molecular testing to healthcare providers and public health laboratories.

“Physical map and genetic map still should be emphasized as an important parts of a reference genome. Recent progress in technologies, such as the whole genome mapping high-throughput platform offered by OpGen, now provide the tools for efficient physical map construction. This independent technology provides not only the validation of the genome sequencing, but also provides the large-scale chromosome structure information that cannot be detected by sequencing. We applied this technology as an assistant tool of the NGS to assemble bacterial, plant and large mammalian genome with reliable accuracy and generate the sub-chromosome graded assembly. The experience in these genome assembly projects shows that the physical map should be the standard for any reference genome to be assembled in further.”

Xun Xu, Ph.D.

Deputy Director at BGI
 

This independent technology provides not only the validation of the genome sequencing, but also provides the large-scale chromosome structure information that cannot be detected by sequencing.

Xun Xu, Ph.D.
Deputy Director at BGI

“Our research focuses on a wide variety of projects from viruses and microbes to crop plants and mammals. Many of our projects are de novo assembly projects, where, without a closely related genome sequence, it can be difficult to critically assess the results. We often combine different sequencing technologies, and we are finding that regardless of the sequencing platform, error correction, or assembler used, OpGen’s Whole Genome Mapping identifies misassemblies and provides the highest quality de novo assembly for further research.”

Matthew Clark, Ph.D.

Team Leader, Sequencing Technology Development

The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC), Norwich, UK

OpGen’s Whole Genome Mapping identifies misassemblies and provides the highest quality de novo assembly for further research.

Matthew Clark, Ph.D.
Team Leader, Sequencing Technology Development

“We adopted OpGen’s Argus System as the most advanced way of adding Whole Genome Mapping to improve whole genome sequences. We combined Whole Genome Maps with sequence assemblies to correct errors and misassemblies in bacterial genome sequences as part of our program in the Human Microbiome Project. We are now moving the technology into larger genome projects.”


George Weinstock, Ph.D.

Associate Director
 The Genome Institute at Washington University

We combined Whole Genome Maps with sequence assemblies to correct errors and misassemblies in bacterial genome sequences. This is part of our program from the Human Microbiome Project.

George Weinstock Ph.D.

Associate Director

The Genome Institute at Washington University

“Certain things you just have a tough time answering with de novo sequencing. And assembly doesn’t always work out as sweetly as you would like. So definitely for any whole genome de novo project that people are insistent on closing we would do a Whole Genome Map optically as well as de novo assembly. And the amount of money you would save is in the thousands of dollars in finishing.”

Stefan Green

Director of DNA Services

University of Illinois Chicago Research Resources Center (UIC RRC)

Definitely for any whole genome de novo project that people are insistent on closing we would do a Whole Genome Map.

Stefan Green
Director of DNA Services

“Physical map and genetic map still should be emphasized as an important parts of a reference genome. Recent progress in technologies, such as the whole genome mapping high-throughput platform offered by OpGen, now provide the tools for efficient physical map construction. This independent technology provides not only the validation of the genome sequencing, but also provides the large-scale chromosome structure information that cannot be detected by sequencing. We applied this technology as an assistant tool of the NGS to assemble bacterial, plant and large mammalian genome with reliable accuracy and generate the sub-chromosome graded assembly. The experience in these genome assembly projects shows that the physical map should be the standard for any reference genome to be assembled in further.”

Xun Xu, Ph.D.

Deputy Director at BGI
 

This independent technology provides not only the validation of the genome sequencing, but also provides the large-scale chromosome structure information that cannot be detected by sequencing.

Xun Xu, Ph.D.
Deputy Director at BGI

“Our research focuses on a wide variety of projects from viruses and microbes to crop plants and mammals. Many of our projects are de novo assembly projects, where, without a closely related genome sequence, it can be difficult to critically assess the results. We often combine different sequencing technologies, and we are finding that regardless of the sequencing platform, error correction, or assembler used, OpGen’s Whole Genome Mapping identifies misassemblies and provides the highest quality de novo assembly for further research.”

Matthew Clark, Ph.D.

Team Leader, Sequencing Technology Development

The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC), Norwich, UK

OpGen’s Whole Genome Mapping identifies misassemblies and provides the highest quality de novo assembly for further research.

Matthew Clark, Ph.D.
Team Leader, Sequencing Technology Development

“We adopted OpGen’s Argus System as the most advanced way of adding Whole Genome Mapping to improve whole genome sequences. We combined Whole Genome Maps with sequence assemblies to correct errors and misassemblies in bacterial genome sequences as part of our program in the Human Microbiome Project. We are now moving the technology into larger genome projects.”


George Weinstock, Ph.D.

Associate Director
 The Genome Institute at Washington University

We combined Whole Genome Maps with sequence assemblies to correct errors and misassemblies in bacterial genome sequences. This is part of our program from the Human Microbiome Project.

George Weinstock Ph.D.

Associate Director

The Genome Institute at Washington University

“Certain things you just have a tough time answering with de novo sequencing. And assembly doesn’t always work out as sweetly as you would like. So definitely for any whole genome de novo project that people are insistent on closing we would do a Whole Genome Map optically as well as de novo assembly. And the amount of money you would save is in the thousands of dollars in finishing.”

Stefan Green

Director of DNA Services

University of Illinois Chicago Research Resources Center (UIC RRC)

Definitely for any whole genome de novo project that people are insistent on closing we would do a Whole Genome Map.

Stefan Green
Director of DNA Services

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