OpGen > About Us > Management Team

Management Team

Evan Jones, Chairman and CEO

Evan Jones Mr. Jones is the Managing Member of jVen Capital, LLC, a life sciences investment company. Prior to forming jVen Capital, he was co-founder, Chairman and CEO of Digene  Corporation, a publicly traded biotechnology company focused on women’s health and molecular diagnostic testing. He is a Board Member of Fluidigm, Inc., Foundation  Medicine, Inc., and Veracyte, Inc. Mr. Jones is Vice-Chairman of the Board of the Children’s National Medical Center and a Board Member of the Children’s Research Institute.  Mr. Jones is Chairman of the Board for the Campaign for Public Health, an organization dedicated to making public health and prevention a higher national priority. He serves on the Board of Directors of Research!America.

Mr. Jones received his BA degree from the University of Colorado and an MBA from The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania.

Kevin Krenitsky, M.D., President

With more than 15 years of experience leading and managing global diagnostic and biotechnology operations, including senior commercial and operational responsibilities at Foundation Medicine, Dr. Krenitsky recently joined OpGen to oversee the rollout of the company’s Acuitas® MDRO (Multi-Drug Resistant Organisms) family of Gene Tests and the Acuitas Lighthouse™ MDRO Management System, which is in development.

Through December 2014, Dr. Krenitsky was chief commercial officer and previously chief operating officer of Foundation Medicine. He joined Foundation in June 2011 and was instrumental in taking the company from a start-up organization to a successful IPO in 2013. Prior to Foundation Medicine, he served as president of Enzo Clinical Labs, where he instituted a comprehensive strategic and operational plan that led to the introduction and launch of numerous FDA-approved esoteric tests, as well as several new laboratory developed tests. Dr. Krenitsky served as chief executive officer at both BioServe Biotechnologies, a global biotechnology company specializing in processing genetic diagnostic tests, and Parkway Clinical Laboratories, a clinical diagnostic lab providing comprehensive routine and esoteric testing. He also held various senior-level positions within Genomics Collaborative, Inc. (a SeraCare Life Sciences Company), a full-scale clinical and genomics research company.

Dr. Krenitsky received a B.S. in business management from the University of Scranton and an M.D. from Jefferson Medical College (now the Sidney Kimmel Medical College) in Philadelphia. He is a former member of the Board of Directors of the New York State Clinical Lab Association and of BioServe Biotechnologies, and serves on the Board of Scientific Directors of GuideDx.

Timothy Dec, CFO

Mr. Dec, has more than 20 years of public company financial leadership experience in technology and healthcare companies. He has served in chief financial officer or other senior financial executive roles at companies in a number of industries, including three publicly traded companies listed on NASDAQ or AMEX, such as Corvis Corporation, and at private equity-backed companies. Prior to joining OpGen, Mr. Dec served as Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer for Clubwidesports, LLC, a start-up sports management software company, from January 2014 to April 2015. From August 2007 to December 2012, He was Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Fortress International Group, Inc., a publicly traded company. Mr. Dec also has public accounting firm experience. He is an adjunct professor at Mount St. Mary’s University in Emmitsburg, Maryland, where he teaches M.B.A. courses in Finance.

Mr. Dec holds a B.S. in accounting from Mount Saint Mary’s University, and an M.B.A. from American University in Washington, DC.

Robert McG. Lilley, Chief Commercial Officer

Mr. Lilley was retained by OpGen in October 2014 as Chief Commercial Officer. Mr. Lilley is currently non‑executive Chairman of the Board of Directors of Immunexpress, Inc., a Seattle-based molecular diagnostic company focused on developing diagnostic tests for patients at risk of sepsis. He previously served as Senior Vice President, Global Sales and Marketing for Digene Corporation, from June 1999 until its sale to QIAGEN NV in 2007. He had held prior sales executive positions with Digene from March 1997 to June 1999. Mr. Lilley worked for QIAGEN NV as Senior Advisor, Molecular Diagnostics from August 2007 until September 2009. He previously served as Head of Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA) Sales and Marketing for TDS Healthcare Information Systems, as well as Senior Vice President and General Manager EMEA of Alltel Healthcare Systems.

In 1970, Mr. Lilley joined the first Earth Day team, and he has retained an interest in environmental affairs since. Today he serves on the Boards of the Global Footprint Network, and Terra Global Capital, both based in the San Francisco Bay Area. He has also served on the Board of Trustees of The Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) at Stanford University. Mr. Lilley holds a BA from Yale University.

Vadim Sapiro, CIO

Vadim Sapiro, CIOMr. Sapiro joined OpGen in December, 2011 with responsibility for leading the development of the Company’s bioinformatics applications, software, databases and information technology operations. Prior to OpGen, Vadim was senior vice president at SAIC-Frederick overseeing the Information Systems Program for the National Cancer Institute at Frederick with responsibility for information technology, scientific computing and bioinformatics. Among Vadim’s projects were technical program management and operations for the cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG™), the cancer Human Biobank (caHUB) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Prior to SAIC, Vadim was vice president for information technology with the J. Craig Venter Institute.  Vadim is active in the regional and national technology and research communities, having served on many life sciences and biotech focused advisory boards and review committees.

Vadim holds a BS in Mathematics and Computer Science from the University of Maryland.

Terry Walker, PhD, Sr.VP, Research & Development

Dr. Walker’s  responsibilities include leading the development of genomic technologies and new products supporting molecular diagnostics for infectious diseases.  Prior to OpGen, Terry previously  led drug target validation , biomarker discovery and clinical diagnostic development at Pfizer, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), Becton Dickinson (BD), Duke University and The Biomarker Factory across most disease areas and stages of development from discovery through late clinical trials.

Terry received his PhD in Biophysical Chemistry from the University of Rochester with postdoctoral training in Biophysical Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley.

David Hoekzema, VP, Business Development & Operations

Mr. Hoekzema joined OpGen in 2012 to expand technology and assay development partnerships in clinical diagnostics and life sciences.  David is also responsible for OpGen’s  production and service operations.  He has over 25 years of experience in global biotechnology markets, with leadership and management roles spanning business  development, sales and marketing, and commercial and technical operations at QIAGEN, Cambrex Biopharmaceuticals, Life Technologies, and Advanced Biotechnologies.  Prior  to OpGen, David was Vice President, Business Development at SAIC, leading the formation of technology partnerships for Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research.

David holds a BS in Biology from Frostburg State University and an MBA from the University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business.

“Physical map and genetic map still should be emphasized as an important parts of a reference genome. Recent progress in technologies, such as the whole genome mapping high-throughput platform offered by OpGen, now provide the tools for efficient physical map construction. This independent technology provides not only the validation of the genome sequencing, but also provides the large-scale chromosome structure information that cannot be detected by sequencing. We applied this technology as an assistant tool of the NGS to assemble bacterial, plant and large mammalian genome with reliable accuracy and generate the sub-chromosome graded assembly. The experience in these genome assembly projects shows that the physical map should be the standard for any reference genome to be assembled in further.”

Xun Xu, Ph.D.

Deputy Director at BGI
 

This independent technology provides not only the validation of the genome sequencing, but also provides the large-scale chromosome structure information that cannot be detected by sequencing.

Xun Xu, Ph.D.
Deputy Director at BGI

“Our research focuses on a wide variety of projects from viruses and microbes to crop plants and mammals. Many of our projects are de novo assembly projects, where, without a closely related genome sequence, it can be difficult to critically assess the results. We often combine different sequencing technologies, and we are finding that regardless of the sequencing platform, error correction, or assembler used, OpGen’s Whole Genome Mapping identifies misassemblies and provides the highest quality de novo assembly for further research.”

Matthew Clark, Ph.D.

Team Leader, Sequencing Technology Development

The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC), Norwich, UK

OpGen’s Whole Genome Mapping identifies misassemblies and provides the highest quality de novo assembly for further research.

Matthew Clark, Ph.D.
Team Leader, Sequencing Technology Development

“We adopted OpGen’s Argus System as the most advanced way of adding Whole Genome Mapping to improve whole genome sequences. We combined Whole Genome Maps with sequence assemblies to correct errors and misassemblies in bacterial genome sequences as part of our program in the Human Microbiome Project. We are now moving the technology into larger genome projects.”


George Weinstock, Ph.D.

Associate Director
 The Genome Institute at Washington University

We combined Whole Genome Maps with sequence assemblies to correct errors and misassemblies in bacterial genome sequences. This is part of our program from the Human Microbiome Project.

George Weinstock Ph.D.

Associate Director

The Genome Institute at Washington University

“Certain things you just have a tough time answering with de novo sequencing. And assembly doesn’t always work out as sweetly as you would like. So definitely for any whole genome de novo project that people are insistent on closing we would do a Whole Genome Map optically as well as de novo assembly. And the amount of money you would save is in the thousands of dollars in finishing.”

Stefan Green

Director of DNA Services

University of Illinois Chicago Research Resources Center (UIC RRC)

Definitely for any whole genome de novo project that people are insistent on closing we would do a Whole Genome Map.

Stefan Green
Director of DNA Services

“Physical map and genetic map still should be emphasized as an important parts of a reference genome. Recent progress in technologies, such as the whole genome mapping high-throughput platform offered by OpGen, now provide the tools for efficient physical map construction. This independent technology provides not only the validation of the genome sequencing, but also provides the large-scale chromosome structure information that cannot be detected by sequencing. We applied this technology as an assistant tool of the NGS to assemble bacterial, plant and large mammalian genome with reliable accuracy and generate the sub-chromosome graded assembly. The experience in these genome assembly projects shows that the physical map should be the standard for any reference genome to be assembled in further.”

Xun Xu, Ph.D.

Deputy Director at BGI
 

This independent technology provides not only the validation of the genome sequencing, but also provides the large-scale chromosome structure information that cannot be detected by sequencing.

Xun Xu, Ph.D.
Deputy Director at BGI

“Our research focuses on a wide variety of projects from viruses and microbes to crop plants and mammals. Many of our projects are de novo assembly projects, where, without a closely related genome sequence, it can be difficult to critically assess the results. We often combine different sequencing technologies, and we are finding that regardless of the sequencing platform, error correction, or assembler used, OpGen’s Whole Genome Mapping identifies misassemblies and provides the highest quality de novo assembly for further research.”

Matthew Clark, Ph.D.

Team Leader, Sequencing Technology Development

The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC), Norwich, UK

OpGen’s Whole Genome Mapping identifies misassemblies and provides the highest quality de novo assembly for further research.

Matthew Clark, Ph.D.
Team Leader, Sequencing Technology Development

“We adopted OpGen’s Argus System as the most advanced way of adding Whole Genome Mapping to improve whole genome sequences. We combined Whole Genome Maps with sequence assemblies to correct errors and misassemblies in bacterial genome sequences as part of our program in the Human Microbiome Project. We are now moving the technology into larger genome projects.”


George Weinstock, Ph.D.

Associate Director
 The Genome Institute at Washington University

We combined Whole Genome Maps with sequence assemblies to correct errors and misassemblies in bacterial genome sequences. This is part of our program from the Human Microbiome Project.

George Weinstock Ph.D.

Associate Director

The Genome Institute at Washington University

“Certain things you just have a tough time answering with de novo sequencing. And assembly doesn’t always work out as sweetly as you would like. So definitely for any whole genome de novo project that people are insistent on closing we would do a Whole Genome Map optically as well as de novo assembly. And the amount of money you would save is in the thousands of dollars in finishing.”

Stefan Green

Director of DNA Services

University of Illinois Chicago Research Resources Center (UIC RRC)

Definitely for any whole genome de novo project that people are insistent on closing we would do a Whole Genome Map.

Stefan Green
Director of DNA Services

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