OpGen > About Us > Clinical Advisory Board

Clinical Advisory Board

Debra A. Goff, Pharm.D., FCCP

Debra A. Goff, PharmD, FCCP, is an Infectious Disease Specialist and past Program Director of the Infectious Diseases Residency at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center (OSUWMC) in Columbus, Ohio. Dr. Goff is a founding member of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Program (ASP) and leads the research program for the Department of Pharmacy. Dr. Goff received her bachelor of pharmacy degree, Doctor of Pharmacy degree, and performed her Pharmacy residency at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

She is a faculty member of the ASHP National Antimicrobial Stewardship mentoring program that provides on-site mentoring to help clinicians learn how to achieve excellence in their ASP. She is also a faculty member and international advisor to the Federation of Infectious Diseases Society of South Africa (FIDSSA) educating and mentoring South African health care providers about stewardship. She is the 2014-2016 recipient of an OSU Outreach and Engagement grant to provide training and mentoring to South African pharmacists. She also is involved in the national research initiative with Making a Difference Infectious Diseases (MAD-ID).

She is actively involved in developing strategies to improve patient outcomes and control the escalating rate of antimicrobial resistance. Dr. Goff incorporates new technology to create useful tools to educate health care providers. She developed a web-based “app” for OSUWMC called STAB-IT (Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia – is terrible) to help guide clinicians on the management of patients with S. aureus bacteremia. She developed and co-authored 2 apps in the Apple & Google Store called Management of Candidemia and Management of Invasive Aspergillosis and Rare Molds in a Stewardship Era. She published an iBook for the iPad titled “Infectious Diseases: There’s an App for That” to provide a free global educational tool for stewardship programs worldwide.

She teaches a social media workshop for healthcare providers titled “How to Use Twitter for Antimicrobial Stewardship”. She is currently studying “Engaging Surgeons in Antimicrobial Stewardship Using Twitter”. She has received numerous research grants and lectures both nationally and internationally. She has published in several journals, including Clinical Infectious Diseases, Archives of Internal Medicine, Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Pharmacotherapy, and others. Her research interest includes antimicrobial resistance, application of rapid diagnostic tests, clinical outcomes, and innovative ways to educate using technology. She is an active member of IDSA, ACCP, ASM, SIDP, MAD-ID and a board member of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) and MAD-ID.


Attila Lorincz, Ph.D.

Dr. Lorincz received a doctorate in genetics from Trinity College, University of Dublin, Ireland. While a research fellow at the University of California, Santa Barbara, he was the first to report that yeast cdc28 is a protein kinase and the prototype of the human cell cycle cdk genes. His human papillomavirus studies began in collaboration with Nobel Laureate Harald zurHausen and this work produced clones of many novel carcinogenic HPV types. In 1990, Dr. Lorincz co-founded Digene Corp. (now QIAGEN Inc.) as Chief Scientific Officer. His research led to the Hybrid Capture (HC) series of tests. HC2 was the first HPV test to be FDA-approved for cervical pre-cancer screening and is widely regarded as the international reference standard. His subsequent research work includes the development of a simple robust HPV test for resource-limited regions and a randomized clinical trial to validate self-sampling as an efficient screening approach to prevent cervical cancer.

Dr. Lorincz is Director of the Molecular Epidemiology Laboratory at the Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine where his research interests include the epigenomics of prostate, breast and cervical cancers. Recently his team has developed a set of new diagnostic and prognostic cancer biomarkers based on DNA methylation assays. He is leading a new discovery initiative in next-generation deep sequencing and in elucidating the comparative epigenomic systems of human cancers. Dr. Lorincz has written more than 240 peer-reviewed papers and is an inventor on 45 patents related to diagnostic and prognostic testing. He was the recipient of several prestigious prizes including the 1994 American Venereal Disease Association Achievement Award and THE TIMES Award 2012 for UK research project of the year. Currently he serves as the Editor-in-Chief of Expert Reviews in Molecular Diagnostics.


Stefan Riedel, M.D., Ph.D., D(ABMM), FCAP

Dr. Riedel is the Associate Medical Director of the Clinical Microbiology Laboratories at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, MA. From 2007 to 2016, Dr. Riedel was the Director of the Clinical Pathology Laboratories at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center; concomitantly, he held an appointment as Assistant Professor in Pathology (2007-2014) and Associate Professor in Pathology (2014-2016) at The Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine. From 2015-2016, he also held an appointment as Associate Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He currently maintains an appointment as Adjunct Associate Professor in Pathology and Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine.

Dr. Riedel’s research is focused on the diagnosis and management of sepsis as well as emerging antimicrobial resistance in gram-negative bacteria, including Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Enterobacteriacea, and non-fermentative bacteria such as Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas. He is particularly interested in surveillance programs for antimicrobial resistance, to enhance the understanding of emergence of antimicrobial resistance as well as the development of interventions to decrease the spread of resistance.

Dr. Riedel is a member of the College of American Pathologists (CAP) Microbiology Resource Committee, which defines and monitors the state of the art and emerging technologies in clinical microbiology, and contributes to the standards of proficiency testing and quality assurance programs for clinical microbiology laboratories in the United States and other countries. Dr. Riedel is an active member of the American Society of Microbiology and a diplomate (active status) of the American Board of Medical Microbiology (ABMM); until 2013, he served on the ABMM examination validation committee. He also serves as an associate editor for BMC Infectious Diseases and is member of the editorial board of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.

Dr. Riedel received his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees in 1996 and 1999, respectively, from the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany. After initial clinical training in general and orthopaedic surgery in England, Germany, and Switzerland, he completed residency training in anatomic and clinical pathology at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, TX, and a 2-year fellowship in medical and public health microbiology at the University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics in Iowa City, IA.


James W. Snyder, Ph.D., D(ABMM), FAAM

Dr. Snyder is the Medical Director of the Clinical Microbiology and Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory at the University of Louisville Hospital, and holds the academic rank, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, at the University of Louisville School of Medicine.

He holds active memberships in the following professional organizations: American Society for Microbiology, South Central Association for Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Disease Society of America, Pan American Virology Association, Society of Surgical Infections, and The Medical Mycological Society of America.

He serves the American Society for Microbiology as its representative to the Laboratory Response Network (LRN) for Preparedness and Response to Bioterrorism and Emerging Infectious Diseases, coordinating editor of the LRN Sentinel Level Laboratory Testing Protocols, co-author of the Anthrax Sentinel Level Protocol, a member of the Laboratory Practices Committee, coordinating editor of the Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, former chairman of Division C (Clinical Microbiology) of the ASM, and a reviewer for the Journal of Clinical Microbiology. He recently was selected to represent the ASM on the APHL Biosafety and Biosecurity Committee. He is a lifetime member of the South Central Association of Clinical Microbiology (SCACM) and has held several leadership positions including having been elected twice as President, and currently serves as a member of the program planning committee for the SCACM Audioconference Series. He has authored or co- authored over 60 publications, five book chapters, numerous abstracts, research posters, and presented numerous invited presentations at the regional, national, and international levels.

Dr. Snyder received his BS and MS degrees from Eastern Kentucky University, his doctorate from the University of Dayton, is board certified as a Diplomat of the American Board of Medical Microbiology, and is a Fellow in the American Academy of Microbiology.

He retired from the U.S. Army Reserves with over 43 years of service including deployment to Iraq in 2011 where he commanded the Medical Task Force in support of Operation New Dawn.


Morten Sommer, Ph.D.

Dr. Sommer is Professor and Associate Scientific Director at the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability (CFB) at the Technical University of Denmark. He received his PhD from Harvard University in Biophysics and before starting his own lab, Dr. Sommer worked with professors George Church (Harvard), Stephen Quake (Caltech, now Stanford) and Sine Larsen (U CPH).

His lab works on understanding and harnessing evolutionary processes and biological diversity.  Genome and metagenome wide screens and perturbations are used in conjunction with synthetic biology tools to understand the evolution and phenotypic stability of biosynthetic processes, drug resistance and complex microbial communities.

He was amongst the first to use functional metagenomics and computational biology to map horizontal gene transfer of antibiotic resistance genes between environmental reservoirs and human pathogens. Recently, the group discovered that antibiotic resistance evolution is frequently associated with collateral sensitivity. The group proposed the concept of collateral sensitivity cycling and the use of collateral sensitivity interactions to rationally deploy antibiotics, which has received considerable attention within the field of antibiotic resistance. Ongoing efforts include focus on improving the understanding of the evolution of collateral sensitivity and the epistatic interactions between mutations that cause collateral sensitivity and resistance.

In addition to his academic endeavours Dr. Sommer is the co-inventor on several patents and patent applications licensed to public and private companies in the US and Europe. Dr. Sommer has also been the co-founder of several biotech companies including Microlytic (2006 – acquired by Anatrace in 2014), AntibioTx (2011), Biosyntia (2012) and Clinical-Microbiomics (2015).

“Physical map and genetic map still should be emphasized as an important parts of a reference genome. Recent progress in technologies, such as the whole genome mapping high-throughput platform offered by OpGen, now provide the tools for efficient physical map construction. This independent technology provides not only the validation of the genome sequencing, but also provides the large-scale chromosome structure information that cannot be detected by sequencing. We applied this technology as an assistant tool of the NGS to assemble bacterial, plant and large mammalian genome with reliable accuracy and generate the sub-chromosome graded assembly. The experience in these genome assembly projects shows that the physical map should be the standard for any reference genome to be assembled in further.”

Xun Xu, Ph.D.

Deputy Director at BGI
 

This independent technology provides not only the validation of the genome sequencing, but also provides the large-scale chromosome structure information that cannot be detected by sequencing.

Xun Xu, Ph.D.
Deputy Director at BGI

“Our research focuses on a wide variety of projects from viruses and microbes to crop plants and mammals. Many of our projects are de novo assembly projects, where, without a closely related genome sequence, it can be difficult to critically assess the results. We often combine different sequencing technologies, and we are finding that regardless of the sequencing platform, error correction, or assembler used, OpGen’s Whole Genome Mapping identifies misassemblies and provides the highest quality de novo assembly for further research.”

Matthew Clark, Ph.D.

Team Leader, Sequencing Technology Development

The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC), Norwich, UK

OpGen’s Whole Genome Mapping identifies misassemblies and provides the highest quality de novo assembly for further research.

Matthew Clark, Ph.D.
Team Leader, Sequencing Technology Development

“We adopted OpGen’s Argus System as the most advanced way of adding Whole Genome Mapping to improve whole genome sequences. We combined Whole Genome Maps with sequence assemblies to correct errors and misassemblies in bacterial genome sequences as part of our program in the Human Microbiome Project. We are now moving the technology into larger genome projects.”


George Weinstock, Ph.D.

Associate Director
 The Genome Institute at Washington University

We combined Whole Genome Maps with sequence assemblies to correct errors and misassemblies in bacterial genome sequences. This is part of our program from the Human Microbiome Project.

George Weinstock Ph.D.

Associate Director

The Genome Institute at Washington University

“Certain things you just have a tough time answering with de novo sequencing. And assembly doesn’t always work out as sweetly as you would like. So definitely for any whole genome de novo project that people are insistent on closing we would do a Whole Genome Map optically as well as de novo assembly. And the amount of money you would save is in the thousands of dollars in finishing.”

Stefan Green

Director of DNA Services

University of Illinois Chicago Research Resources Center (UIC RRC)

Definitely for any whole genome de novo project that people are insistent on closing we would do a Whole Genome Map.

Stefan Green
Director of DNA Services

“Physical map and genetic map still should be emphasized as an important parts of a reference genome. Recent progress in technologies, such as the whole genome mapping high-throughput platform offered by OpGen, now provide the tools for efficient physical map construction. This independent technology provides not only the validation of the genome sequencing, but also provides the large-scale chromosome structure information that cannot be detected by sequencing. We applied this technology as an assistant tool of the NGS to assemble bacterial, plant and large mammalian genome with reliable accuracy and generate the sub-chromosome graded assembly. The experience in these genome assembly projects shows that the physical map should be the standard for any reference genome to be assembled in further.”

Xun Xu, Ph.D.

Deputy Director at BGI
 

This independent technology provides not only the validation of the genome sequencing, but also provides the large-scale chromosome structure information that cannot be detected by sequencing.

Xun Xu, Ph.D.
Deputy Director at BGI

“Our research focuses on a wide variety of projects from viruses and microbes to crop plants and mammals. Many of our projects are de novo assembly projects, where, without a closely related genome sequence, it can be difficult to critically assess the results. We often combine different sequencing technologies, and we are finding that regardless of the sequencing platform, error correction, or assembler used, OpGen’s Whole Genome Mapping identifies misassemblies and provides the highest quality de novo assembly for further research.”

Matthew Clark, Ph.D.

Team Leader, Sequencing Technology Development

The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC), Norwich, UK

OpGen’s Whole Genome Mapping identifies misassemblies and provides the highest quality de novo assembly for further research.

Matthew Clark, Ph.D.
Team Leader, Sequencing Technology Development

“We adopted OpGen’s Argus System as the most advanced way of adding Whole Genome Mapping to improve whole genome sequences. We combined Whole Genome Maps with sequence assemblies to correct errors and misassemblies in bacterial genome sequences as part of our program in the Human Microbiome Project. We are now moving the technology into larger genome projects.”


George Weinstock, Ph.D.

Associate Director
 The Genome Institute at Washington University

We combined Whole Genome Maps with sequence assemblies to correct errors and misassemblies in bacterial genome sequences. This is part of our program from the Human Microbiome Project.

George Weinstock Ph.D.

Associate Director

The Genome Institute at Washington University

“Certain things you just have a tough time answering with de novo sequencing. And assembly doesn’t always work out as sweetly as you would like. So definitely for any whole genome de novo project that people are insistent on closing we would do a Whole Genome Map optically as well as de novo assembly. And the amount of money you would save is in the thousands of dollars in finishing.”

Stefan Green

Director of DNA Services

University of Illinois Chicago Research Resources Center (UIC RRC)

Definitely for any whole genome de novo project that people are insistent on closing we would do a Whole Genome Map.

Stefan Green
Director of DNA Services

CLOSE